Paul Taylor Dance Company

TAYLOR REPERTOIRE

Click on a dance title to view additional information.
Click on a music link where provided to hear an excerpt from the score.

...BYZANTIUM

Opus Number:  81
Music:  Edgard Varèse
Set:  David Gropman
Costumes:  William Ivey Long
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  March 20, 1984
Notes:  In a dance with stunning movement invention, spectacular sets and a spiky score by 20th Century iconoclast Edgar Varèse, Paul Taylor recalls the Byzantine Empire, an economic, political and cultural “superpower” whose thousand-year reign ended in the 15th Century. The dance begins with a quartet of holy figures performing a religious ceremony, after which a flagellant engages in repentance. With the passage of time, morality decays and, with the dancers staggering as if from an earthquake, the empire collapses – as empires often do.“Taylor is revisiting the Dante circles of hell… A savage work, full of brutalized images, pictures of destruction and suggestions of decay. Taylor’s apocalyptic vision is gross and nasty, appallingly graphic, yet mightily effective in its fierce-etched power.” – Clive Barnes, New York Post

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

3 EPITAPHS

Opus Number:  4
Music:  Early New Orleans jazz
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  George Tacet
Date First Performed:  March 27, 1956
Notes:  “A parade of faceless, gray-leotarded figures to early New Orleans jazz — funeral music — is one of the funniest dances anywhere.  An essay on posture and gesture — and genius.” – Janice Berman, Newsday

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

3-Epitaphs_rep2

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

 

9 DANCES WITH MUSIC BY CORELLI

Opus Number:  40
Music:  Arcangelo Corelli
Costumes:  Rouben Ter-Arutunian
Lighting:  William Ritman
Date First Performed:  March 31, 1965

A FIELD OF GRASS

Opus Number:  100
Music:  Songs sung by Harry Nilsson
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 27, 1993
Notes:  “A master of mixing dark and light, Paul Taylor outdid himself in A Field of Grass, a stunningly succinct recreation of the apocalyptic 1960’s and the decade’s appetite for love, death and drugs.” – Jennifer Dunning, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

 

AB OVO USQUE AD MALA (FROM SOUP TO NUTS)

Opus Number:  84
Music:  P.D.Q. Bach (Peter Schickele)
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 1, 1986

Photo: T. Brazil

Photo: T. Brazil

AGATHE'S TALE

Opus Number:  43
Music:  Carlos Surinach (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Julian Tomchin
Date First Performed:  August 12, 1967

Photo: Jack Mitchell

Photo: Jack Mitchell

AIRS

Opus Number:  68
Music:  G.F. Handel
Costumes:  Gene Moore
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  May 30, 1978
Notes:  “Airs is a new and distinctive vintage, of mellowness and classic finish that give it a sublime autumnal glow. Incredibly diversified and complex. The whole work is a treasure.” – Alan M. Kriegsman, Washington Post

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

ALSO PLAYING

Opus Number:  130
Music:  Gaetano Donizetti
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 8, 2009
Notes:  Ballet music by Donizetti propels a Vaudeville revue with acts ranging from an Apache dance and a tap-dancing horse (a true hoofer) to a striptease and flag-waving march. Among the performers are a toreador whose sissy bulls are frightened of her, a dying swan in her lengthy final throes, and a star-struck stagehand who takes a turn with his broom. The dance is “Dedicated to all Vaudevillians, especially those who went on no matter what.”

“A madcap tribute to vaudeville [that] celebrates the sublime and the ridiculous aspects of the traveling theater families who brought entertainment to small-town America between the Civil War and the advent of radio…. It reminds us that vaudeville was a rare breath of the world of art and music for young people in dusty farming towns. The vaudeville performers of old, if perhaps technically flawed, were plucky and gave their all.” – Kristen Fountain, Valley News

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

AMERICAN DREAMER

Opus Number:  139
Music:  Stephen Foster Songs sung by Thomas Hampson
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  August 5, 2013

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

AMERICAN GENESIS

Opus Number:  58
Music:  J.S. Bach, Franz Josef Haydn, John Fahey, Bohuslav Martinů and Louis Moreau Gottschalk
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 13, 1973

Photo: Z. Freyman

Photo: Z. Freyman

ANTIQUE VALENTINE

Opus Number:  115
Music:  J.S. Bach, Carl Maria von Weber, Joseph Haydn, Ludwig van Beethoven, Frederic Chopin and Felix Mendelssohn played on music boxes, player piano, and mechanical organ
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 26, 2001
Notes:  Taylor skewers romance in a comedy of manners that depicts lovers as glassy-eyed robotic naifs responding less to love than convention. Wind-up dolls play out comic courtships to the strains of classical chestnuts performed on 19th-Century music boxes and player pianos. Taylor’s usual flowing movement is replaced by restricted mechanical steps within cotillion formations and Victorian-era social dances, slightly askew. The main protagonist is a bumbling ninny who is unable to fetch his sweetheart’s dropped hanky without losing his hat, and the flower he proffers makes both of them sneeze. Their nuptial ceremony suggests that marriage is sometimes the province of automatons.

“A witty little existentialist allegory. Like all Mr. Taylor’s comic gems, it is a commentary on human foibles. Its world is inhabited by turn-of-the-century music-box figurines, surrogates for ourselves. When a doll-like dancer stiffly offers a posy to his sweetheart, she proves allergic: the human condition summed up in one big sneeze.” – Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

Antique Valentine

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

APHRODISIAMANIA

Opus Number:  67
Music:  Renaissance music re-orchestrated by Donald York
Set and Costumes:  Gene Moore
Date First Performed:  November 29, 1977
Notes:  Scenario by Charles Ludlam

Photo: J. Vartoogiam

Photo: J. Vartoogiam

Photo: S. Cook

Photo: S. Cook

ARABESQUE

Opus Number:  111
Music:  Claude Debussy
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 15, 1999
Notes:  “Fascinating… A mysterious world of archaic creatures and fleeting encounters. Fierce, impossibly swift dancing that blends earthy ferocity with skimming airiness.” – Susan Reiter, Newsday

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

ARDEN COURT

Opus Number:  73
Music:  William Boyce
Set and Costumes:  Gene Moore
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 15, 1981
Notes:  “One of the few great art works created in [the 20th] century… exploring a new movement field of love and relationship. The women dance into the men’s arms as if Shakespeare had only written Romeo and Juliet the day before yesterday. I am convinced that this is one of the sentimental works of our time… something extraordinary in the history of dance. It bounces to a different drummer.” – Clive Barnes, New York Post

Arden-Court_rep1

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Arden-Court-rep2

Photo: Paul B. Goode

AUREOLE

Opus Number:  30
Music:  George Frideric Handel
Set and Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Thomas Skelton
Date First Performed:  August 4, 1962
Notes:  “Aureole, perhaps his first major success, was the first time Taylor combined his loping antelope style of movement with baroque music, and its grace and individuality instantly spun into orbit throughout the world of dance. There is an interestingly variegated luminosity of spirit that recalls fluffy clouds on Shakespeare’s summer’s day.” – Clive Barnes, New York Post

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Aureole Heather retouched PBG web

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

BANQUET OF VULTURES

Opus Number:  123
Music:  Morton Feldman
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 29, 2005
Notes:  “Paul Taylor might be the only American choreographer I would trust with the subject of war, and Banquet of Vultures is one of his most jarring and effective works… The choice of music is Taylor’s genius stroke… what one might have heard at Abu Ghraib.” – Paul Horsley, Kansas City Star

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

BELOVED RENEGADE

Opus Number:  129
Music:  Francis Poulenc
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  November 21, 2008
Notes:  Set to Francis Poulenc’s choral “Gloria,” the dance was inspired by the life and work of 19th Century American writer Walt Whitman, who revered the body and soul as one and who famously loved all with equal ardor. It depicts the experiences of an artist described in a line from Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass”: “I am the poet of the body and I am the poet of the soul.” Scenes from his life include watching youngsters at play, and tending to the afflicted just as Whitman nursed wounded soldiers during the Civil War. After his own mortality is foretold, the poet bids poignant farewell to those who love him. He is then embraced by a benevolent feminine spirit with “the sure-enwinding arms of cool-enfolding death.””The best new choreography in 2008. Deeply moving… a work of philosophic as well as dramatic power. Mr. Taylor ranks among the great war poets… One of the great achievements of his long career and one of the most eloquently textured feats of his singular imagination.” — Alastair Macaulay, New York Times

New BelovedRenegade_4541_web

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

BIG BERTHA

Opus Number:  50
Music:  Music from the St. Louis Melody Museum collection of band machines
Set and Costumes:  Alec Sutherland
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  November 6, 1970
Notes:  “A hair-raising, though provoking, brilliant work that starts out as hilarious comedy and ends as tragedy…It moves with inescapable power from innocent pleasures to incestuous rape” – Dorothy Samachson, Chicago Daily News

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

BIG BERTHA DUET FOR TELEVISION

Opus Number:  51
Notes:  Duet for television first aired March 1971

BLACK TUESDAY

Opus Number:  114
Music:  Songs from the Great Depression
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 10, 2001
Notes:  The once mighty jumped to their deaths from skyscrapers, former millionaires sold apples on street corners, and every metropolis sprouted Shantytowns. America was in the grip of the Great Depression – but rather than dwell on its terrible effects, popular culture from Tin Pan Alley to Hollywood celebrated the nation’s can-do spirit. Paul Taylor recalls the valiant souls of the ’30s with a masterwork from his Americana series. He peoples his Shantytown with Vaudevillians and Doughboys, hookers and showgirls, all eking out a meager existence on the streets of the city. Music hall hoofers recall their heyday, down-and-out couples jitterbug down Park Avenue, a pimp continues to hawk his wares, and a newsgirl pretends to slay the big bad wolf that is the Depression. Sections set to “The Boulevard Of Broken Dreams” – the era’s great torch song – and “Brother, Can You Spare A Dime?” – its enduring anthem – powerfully illustrate the tragedy of shattered hopes and dreams.“[Taylor is] still making waves in the dance world with his quirky, beautiful, dark, inventive and visceral work. Black Tuesday, set to songs from the Great Depression, could be added to a file titled, ‘Paul Taylor’s Master Works’. All elements, combined to provide the ultimate experience of seeing a world come to life before your eyes…“ – Susan Broili, Durham Herald-Sun

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Listen to Music Excerpt

BOOK OF BEASTS

Opus Number:  52
Music:  Schubert, Weber, Saint-Saëns, Mozart, Beethoven, Boccherini, de Falla and Tchaikovsky, transcribed for harpsichord
Costumes:  John Rawlings
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  July 2, 1971
Notes:  “A sardonic suite that mocks human foibles, medievalism, music and dance conventions in thoroughly beguiling ways. A lovely, fiendishly clever dance.” – Deborah Jowitt, Village Voice
Listen to Music Excerpt

BRANDENBURGS

Opus Number:  88
Music:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 5, 1988
Notes:  “Beauty is the only word for Brandenburgs…[which] celebrates the good things in life. Such a radiant, seamless flow of invention that the choreography seems an entirely natural way of moving to this music.” – Mary Clarke, Manchester [UK] Guardian

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

BRIEF ENCOUNTERS

Opus Number:  131
Music:  Claude Debussy
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  James F. Ingalls
Date First Performed:  November 6, 2009
Notes:  A dance about people more concerned with momentary connections than ongoing relationships. Men and women converge at a secret trysting place in the dead of night – not for romance, but to satisfy their pure animal instincts.

“The dancers, beautifully adult and near naked in trim black underwear, passed through transient scenes of sexual desire, emotional perplexity and more… Every emotion and meeting seems young, pristine, mysterious.” — Alastair Macaulay, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

CASCADE

Opus Number:  110
Music:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  July 22, 1999
Notes:  “Cascade glitters. The central section…is one of Mr. Taylor’s most beautiful duets. The two bodies fold in and out of themselves…in choreography that pours out like thick cream. One can see, in this duet particularly, Mr. Taylor’s gift for subtle emotional detail.” – Jennifer Dunning, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

CHANGES

Opus Number:  128
Music:  Songs sung by The Mamas & The Papas
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 22, 2008
Notes:  The 1960s began in a spirit of unbridled optimism, with Americans electing the youngest President ever. That optimism was short-lived, dashed by assassinations, race riots and the nation’s tragic involvement in the Vietnam War. Changes revisits that time through songs of the iconic folk/rock group, The Mamas and The Papas. The opening section reveals snippets of popular dance steps as an announcer introduces the vocal group at a rock concert. After we’re reminded that this was the era of “free love,” the dance grows dark with sections about an impending earthquake, hallucinogenic drugs and the growing radicalization of young people as they defied authority and embraced liberation movements. In a dream sequence, a boy learning from a father figure hurts himself and is comforted by the older man. The dance climaxes with an anthem of the era, “California Dreamin’”, uniting the disillusioned young people. A program note states that while we remember the turbulent ’60s as unique, in fact they were not – 40 years later the country is again involved in an unpopular war amid demands for change, indicating that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

“A spellbinding time capsule of the Californian 1960s… The dancers’ re-enactment of the ’60s in an extraordinary feat of acting. The costumes and wigs are deliciously period… It travels from episode to episode, each depicted and shaped with mastery, all vivid and different.” — Alastair Macaulay, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

CHURCHYARD

Opus Number:  48
Costumes:  Alec Sutherland
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  December 10, 1969

Photo: Jack Mitchell

Photo: Jack Mitchell

CIRCUS POLKA

Opus Number: 2
Music: Igor Stravinsky
Costumes: Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting: Marc May and John Robertson
Date First Performed: March 15, 1955

Photo: Stephan

Photo: Stephan

CLOVEN KINGDOM

Opus Number:  63
Music:  Arcangelo Corelli, Henry Cowell, and Malloy Miller
Costumes:  Women’s Costumes by Scott Barrie, Headpieces by John Rawlings
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  June 9, 1976
Notes:  “Man is a social animal,” said Spinoza. Just below the surface of humans’ civilized veneer lurks an animal nature that cannot be ignored. The scene is a cotillion ball where members of high society are dressed in formal attire – the gentlemen in tailcoats and the ladies wearing gowns and mirrored headpieces. A baroque score vies for dominance with urgent, percussive 20th-Century music, reflecting the struggle between our gentler and more savage natures. As primitive impulses emerge, the women plant seeds and bear progeny, while the men seem no longer to wear tails but bear tails. They prance and stalk on all fours, and their totemic friezes suggest the prehistoric ancestors from whom we have descended. Although the dance ends on a triumphant note with social structures intact, it has become clear that we are not separate from animals, we are animals.“A sharp comedy of manners [about] the conflicting natures within people and, more specifically, the darker side that surfaces under the veneer of gentility. Revealing their true selves, the dancers turn humorously grotesque. The writhe as well as waltz, they crawl as well as glide. There’s so much movement-invention that it is hard to take everything in.” – Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

COMPANY B

Opus Number:  96
Music:  Songs sung by the Andrews Sisters
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  June 20, 1991
Notes:  Just as America began to emerge from the Depression at the dawn of the 1940s, the country was drawn into the Second World War. In a seminal piece of Americana, Paul Taylor recalls that turbulent era through the hit songs of the Andrews Sisters. Although the songs depict a nation surging with high spirits, millions of men were bidding farewell to wives or girlfriends and many would never return from battle. The dance focuses on such poignant dualities. Young lovers lindy, jitterbug and polka in a near manic grasp for happiness while in the background shadowy figures – soldiers – fall dead. Among the sections of the dance, the one choreographed to “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy (of Company B)” is carefree until the moment the bugler is shot; the one set to “I Can Dream, Can’t I?” tells of a young lady’s affections for a soldier an ocean away who, for his part, reaches out to a comrade in arms. The dance ends just as it began, with “Bei Mir Bist du Schön” – but the world has clearly changed.“Evokes the exuberant rhythms of the ’40’s as well as the grim and persistent shadow of war. But even more vividly, it honors Taylor’s magnificent dancers. Some of the most glorious dancing to be seen anywhere…” – Laura Shapiro, Newsweek

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

COUNTERSWARM

Opus Number:  89
Music:  György Ligeti
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 28, 1988
Notes:  “Entomological eroticism… as essay in movement invention. In this intriguing and insistent whirlpool of dance…the familiar had been made to look strange, the commonplace transformed into a glistening fantasy. If you think a cockroach can’t look exotic, you obviously haven’t seen Counterswarm.” – Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

Counterswarm

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Listen to Music Excerpt

DANBURY MIX

Opus Number:  90
Music:  Charles Ives
Set:  David Gropman
Costumes:  William Ivey Long
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  May 12, 1988

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

DANDELION WINE

Opus Number:  113
Music:  Pietro Locatelli
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  November 16, 2000
Notes:  The vibrant rhythms of a Baroque violin concerto by Locatelli propel a joyful romp in which Paul Taylor captures the essence of springtime by spotlighting the fresh qualities of his youngest dancers. A master of ceremonies dressed in dandelion yellow leads carefree young men and women who might have begun their afternoon romp sipping a heady elixir. The women converse, the men compete. With the arrival of a playful outsider, a romantic duo becomes a trio, which signals her acceptance by the group. The steps mirror the growing intricacies of the violin’s florid cadenzas as the dancers, hand in hand, become absurdly intertwined. By retracing their steps, they find their way out of their entanglement. The dance ends with all the young lovers still holding hands, ladies perched merrily on the shoulders of their beaus.“An instant winner, a joyous ode to the springtime of life… one of his most dazzling works.” – Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

DANTE VARIATIONS

Opus Number:  120
Music:  György Ligeti
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  March 24, 2004
Notes:  “Richly decadent choreography…tales of violence, lasciviousness and death. Boldly choreographed and deeply conceptual, Dante Variations left one feeling amused, hurt, emotionally drained.” – Paul Horsley, Kansas City Star

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Listen to Music Excerpt

DE SUEÑOS (OF DREAMS)

Opus Number:  126
Music:  Agustín Lara, Juan García Esquivel, Osvaldo Golijov, B. García de Jesús, J. Elizondo, Ariel Guzik, Chalino Sánchez
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer TIpton
Date First Performed:  July 12, 2007
Notes:  De Sueños (of dreams) and its companion piece, De Sueños que se Repiten (of recurring dreams), are surrealistic dreamscapes that take place on the Day of the Dead, a Mexican holiday combining aspects of Catholic theology and Aztec culture when deceased relatives are honored. A series of images reference such aspects of Mexican culture as the Virgin of Guadalupe, hat dance and deer dance. The music of several contemporary Mexican composers, as well as elaborate sets and lighting, intensify the cinematic, other-worldy quality of the dances. The two works may be presented together or separately and in either order.

“A dream of a dance. This vision conjures up a host of characters who would never appear together in waking life. Taylor’s ‘dream’ provides so vivid, I think these characters will invade my dreams… Thank goodness, Taylor’s are more thrilling than mine.” – Susan Broili, Durham Herald-Sun

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

Listen to Music Excerpt

DE SUEÑOS QUE SE REPITEN (OF RECURRING DREAMS)

Opus Number:  127
Music:  Ariel Guzik, Silvestre Revueltas, Margarita Lecuona, Robert Gómez Bolaños, Severiano Briseño
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  November 2, 2007
Notes:  De Sueños (of dreams) and De Sueños que se Repiten (of recurring dreams) are surrealistic dreamscapes that take place on the Day of the Dead, a Mexican holiday combining aspects of Catholic theology and Aztec culture when deceased relatives are honored. A series of images reference such aspects of Mexican culture as the Virgin of Guadalupe, hat dance and deer dance. The music of several contemporary Mexican composers, as well as elaborate sets and lighting, intensify the cinematic, other-worldy quality of the dances. The two works may be presented together or separately and in either order.

“Fabulous new works… For all their turbulence and the occasional human sacrifice, these Mexican dreamscapes are refuges, places where death sentences are commuted, where people dodge machete blows through magical substitutions, and the action may roll backward. These destinations are different from, but perhaps as comforting as, the “monuments of unaging intellect” in which Yeats sought consolation. [They] offer the youthful pleasures of comedy, strength and sensuality.” – Robert Johnson, Star-Ledger

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

DIGGITY

Opus Number:  69
Music:  Donald York (commissioned score)
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Mark Litvin
Date First Performed:  November 3, 1978
Notes:  “A mysteriously joyous… wonderful, crazy excursion into the unknown. Taylor has bestrewn the stage with wonderful Alex Katz profiles of dogs – mean, handsome, arrogant, underprivileged – that provide an obstacle course for Taylor’s dancers…who swing their way through the obliquely simple choreography with an almost contemptuous élan.” – Clive Barnes, New York Post

Photo: Johan Elbers

Photo: Johan Elbers

Listen to Music Excerpt

DREAM GIRLS

Opus Number:  117
Music:  Barbershop quartet songs sung by The Buffalo Bills
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 18, 2002
Notes:  “So politically incorrect in so many directions it almost seems to be tweaking earnest downtown dance, but spinning out with such complete mastery of the turn-of the-century vernacular — high vaudeville and low burlesque — it’s bliss” – Laura Jacobs, The New Criterion

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

DUET

Opus Number:  38
Music:  Franz Josef Haydn
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Thomas Skelton
Date First Performed:  August 18, 1964

Duet-from-Lento_rep1

Photo: PTDC Archives

DUETS

Opus Number:  47
Music:  Anonymous Medival Composers
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Judith Daykin
Date First Performed:  August 2, 1969

DUST

Opus Number:  66
Music:  Francis Poulenc
Set and Costumes:  Gene Moore
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  June 1, 1977
Notes:  “The man is a genius [which he demonstrated] again with a fantastic new and macabre ballet. Remarkably well danced, with the company moving through this Goya-like vision of hell-in-life with the even-humored energy of athletes.“ – Clive Barnes, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

EQUINOX

Opus Number:  80
Music:  Johannes Brahms
Costumes:  William Ivey Long
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  December 1, 1983
Notes:  “A complex and lovely work…beautifully wrought and surreptitiously gripping. A neo-classical abstraction in the line of Aureole and Arden Court, with an emphasis on musically motivated movement patterns and formal elegance.” – Alan M. Kriegsman, Washington Post

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

ESPLANADE

Opus Number:  61
Music:  Johann Sebastian Bach
Costumes:  John Rawlings
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  March 1, 1975
Notes:  An esplanade is an outdoor place to walk; in 1975 Paul Taylor, inspired by the sight of a girl running to catch a bus, created a masterwork based on pedestrian movement. If contemporaries Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg could use ordinary “found objects” like Coke bottles and American flags in their art, Taylor would use such “found movements” as standing, walking, running, sliding and falling. The first of five sections that are set to two Bach violin concertos introduces a team of eight dancers brimming with Taylor’s signature youthful exuberance. An adagio for a family whose members never touch reflects life’s somber side. When three couples engage in romantic interplay, a woman standing tenderly atop her lover’s prone body suggests that love can hurt as well as soothe. The final section has dancers careening fearlessly across the stage like Kamikazes. The littlest of them – the daughter who had not been acknowledged by her family – is left alone on stage, triumphant: the meek inheriting the earth.“When I left the theater… I was thinking that I’d seen a classic of American dance. It confers a mythic dimension on ordinary aspects of our daily lives – it’s unfaked folk art. The dancers, crashing wave upon wave into those falls, have a happy insane spirit that recalls a unique moment in American life – the time we did the school play or we were ready to drown at a swimming meet. The last time most of us were happy in that way.” – Arlene Croce, The New Yorker

Esplanade_rep2

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Esplanade_rep2

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

 

EVENTIDE

Opus Number:  105
Music:  Ralph Vaughan Williams
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  February 25, 1997
Notes:  “The American spirit soars when Taylor’s dances and dancers meet, but rarely has it reached the sublime heights of this piece. It is a paean to remembered love, with couple after loving couple looking back even as they embrace an unknown future… It is bittersweet but, typical for Taylor, also optimistic and uplifting. An American masterpiece.” – Octavio Roca, San Francisco Chronicle

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

FACT & FANCY (3 EPITAPHS & ALL)

Opus Number:  95
Music:  Early New Orleans Jazz, and Reggae
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg (3 EPITAPHS) and George Tacet
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  June 6, 1991

Photo: J. Anderson

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: J. Anderson

Photo: PTDC Archives

 

FETES

Opus Number:  53
Music:  Claude Debussy
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 16, 1971

FIBERS

Opus Number:  26
Music:  Arnold Schoenberg
Set and Costumes:  Rouben Ter-Arutunian
Date First Performed:  January 14, 1961

Fibers_rep1

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Fibers_rep2

Photo: Paul B. Goode

FIBERS DUET FOR TELEVISION

Opus Number:  33
Date First Performed:  May 20, 1963
Notes:  Duet for Television

FIDDLERS GREEN

Opus Number:  108
Music:  John Adams
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  May 23, 1998

FIENDS ANGELICAL

Opus Number:  112
Music:  George Crumb
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  July 25, 2000
Notes:  “A dark jewel; a black opal of a ballet… a formalized ceremony of good and evil. Blood and violence never seem very far away from these dancers…performing their sacramental duties with feverish dedication, supervised by the priestess with tempestuous authority. And like almost everything Taylor and his magnificent dancers touch, it is theater burned into the stage, and, even more, burned on the audience’s imagination.” – Clive Barnes, New York Post

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

FOREIGN EXCHANGE

Opus Number:  49
Music:  Morton Subotnick
Set:  Alex Katz
Costumes:  Alec Sutherland
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 28, 1970

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA

Opus Number:  39
Music:  Charles Ives (later, commissioned score by John Herbert McDowell)
Costumes:  John Rawlings
Lighting:  Tom Skelton
Date First Performed:  March 31, 1965
Notes:  “If the United States had a proper arts policy, Paul Taylor would be declared a national treasure…Sea [has a] naughtily satiric view of Lady Liberty and the other symbols of America ranging from Superman to the KKK… Darkly funny.” – Christine Temin, Boston Globe

Photo: Jack Mitchell

Photo: Jack Mitchell

Photo: Jack Mitchell

Photo: Jack Mitchell

FUNNY PAPERS


Opus Number:  101
Choreography:  Sandra Stone, Mary Cochran, Hernando Cortez, David Grenke, Andrew Asnes and Patrick Corbin. Amended and combined by Paul Taylor
Music:  Novelty tunes
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 12, 1994
Notes:  “A mega-hit…The recordings are side-splitting, the choreography is hilarious, the dancers are terrific…A new work so comic in its intensity that it would be a grave mistake to consider it only lighthearted…Taylor’s dedication [to the comics] speaks exactly to the human need that this dance satisfies so brilliantly and shrewdly” – Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

GOSSAMER GALLANTS

Opus Number:  135
Music:  Bedřich Smetana
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  November 19, 2011
Notes: Using movement inspired by insects, the dance offers a comedic view of mating rituals, in which the female of the species is often the stronger, predatory partner.

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

GUESTS OF MAY

Opus Number:  54
Music:  Claude Debussy
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  March 11, 1972

HOUSE OF CARDS

Opus Number:  74
Music:  Darius Milhaud
Set:  Mimi Gross
Costumes:  Cynthia O’Neal
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 6, 1981

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

HOUSE OF JOY

Opus Number:  136
Music:  Donald York
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  March 17, 2012

IMAGES

Opus Number:  65
Music:  Claude Debussy
Costumes:  Gene Moore
Lighting:  Mark Litvin
Date First Performed:  January 19, 1977
Notes:  “All two-dimensional friezes, human endeavor frozen in time, and oracular obsolescence. It carries the feel of pottery shards, the dust of the British Museum, the surprise of a fall through the shaft of a buried gravesite in Tuscany where the flashlight reveals a brilliantly hued mural left by [Minoans].” – Allison Tracy, Berkshire Eagle

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

IMAGES AND REFLECTIONS

Opus Number:  19
Music:  Morton Feldman
Costumes:  (and props) Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  Tharon Musser
Date First Performed:  December 20, 1958

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

IMAGES AND REFLECTIONS FOR TELEVISION

Opus Number:  20
Date First Performed:  February 13, 1960
Notes:  Version for Television

IN THE BEGINNING

Opus Number:  118
Music:  Carl Orff, orchestrated by Freidrich K. Wanek
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 9, 2003
Notes:  In this Genesis tale as retold by Paul Taylor, Jehovah creates heaven and earth, and Adam and Eve, who in short order eat from the Tree of Knowledge and find themselves and their offspring banished from the Garden of Eden. Set to music by Carl Orff as performed by wind ensemble, In The Beginning presents a God capable of rage as well as the healing powers of redemption as he forgives his errant children.

“A quick survey of the Book of Genesis (rather like the 40-minute dash round the Louvre). Wonderfully merry or anguished dances. The piece is sly, ambiguous and terrific. Taylor must have attended a really wonky Sunday school.” – Clement Crisp, Financial Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

INSECTS AND HEROES

Opus Number:  27
Music:  John Herbert McDowell (commissioned score)
Set and Costumes:  Rouben Ter-Arutunian
Lighting:  Louise Guthman
Date First Performed:  August 18, 1961

Photo: N. Tikhomiroff

Photo: N. Tikhomiroff

Photo: Marchiori

Photo: Marchiori

JACK AND THE BEANSTALK

Opus Number: 1
Music: Hy Gubernick (commissioned score)
Set and Costumes: Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting: Marc May
Date First Performed: May 30, 1954

Photo: Stephan

Photo: Stephan

JUNCTION

Opus Number: 28
Music: Johann Sebastian Bach
Set and Costumes: Alex Katz
Lighting: Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed: November 24, 1961

Junction 3

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

KITH AND KIN

Opus Number:  86
Music:  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Costumes:  William Ivey Long
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 28, 1987

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

KLEZMERBULEGRASS

Opus Number:  121
Music:  Traditional Klezmer and Bluegrass music, arranged by Margot Leverett
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 24, 2004

Photo: Lois Greenfield

Photo: Lois Greenfield

Photo: Todd Rosenberg

Photo: Todd Rosenberg

LA NEGRA

Opus Number:  32
Music:  Mariachi music
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  George Tacet
Date First Performed:  January 24, 1963

LAST LOOK

Opus Number:  83
Music:  Donald York
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 16, 1985
Notes:  “A frightening vision of urban apocalypse…Last Look is so engrossing that when the lights go up for curtain calls, one wonders for an instant where these nine smiling young humanoids came from.” – Martha Duffy, Time

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

LE GRAND PUPPETIER

Opus Number:  119
Music:  Igor Stravinsky played on pianola
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  March 2, 2004
Notes:  Set to a pianola version of Stravinsky’s score for the ballet “Petrushka,” Le Grand Puppetier is likewise about a puppet who is brought to life. Mr. Taylor’s story involves a malevolent emperor, his lovely daughter, and the effete courtier the emperor wants his daughter to marry. She, however, only has eyes for one of the emperor’s guardsmen. When the emperor brings a puppet to life to entertain his subjects, the puppet discovers human emotions. Eventually the puppet steals the emperor’s magic wand – the source of his power – and enslaves the emperor with it. Thus the plot of this beguiling dance tells us that which couple ties the knot depends on who winds up pulling the strings – but its underlying theme is that absolute power corrupts absolutely.

“A quirky rethinking of Stravinsky’s “Petrushka”, heard in a recorded pianola version [that] makes you hear the score anew. It carries a cautionary punch. Only Taylor’s charmingly twisted imagination could supply the fable’s sudden, surprising double-reversal ending.” – Rachel Howard, San Francisco Chronicle

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPS (THE REHEARSAL)

Opus Number:  72
Music:  Igor Stravinsky (arrangement for piano)
Set and Costumes:  John Rawlings
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  January 15, 1980
Notes:  “It takes a genius to upstage another genius, and that’s just about what Paul Taylor accomplished in his deliciously berserk dance version of Igor Stravinsky’s hallowed, epoch-making score… Taylor uses this musical masterpiece as if it were simply a fiendishly interesting piece of music… in devising a dance charade of ever so brittle, arch and waspish humor.” – Alan M. Kriegsman, Washington Post

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

LENTO

Opus Number: 44
Music: Franz Josef Haydn
Costumes: George Tacet
Lighting: Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed: August 12, 1967

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

LINES OF LOSS

Opus Number:  125
Music:  Guillaume de Machaut, Christopher Tye, Jack Body, John Cage, Arvo Pärt and Alfred Schnittke
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  March 2, 2007
Notes:  “Impossible to watch and not be moved to mourning. Lines of Loss is gut wrenching and gorgeous. As you would expect of Taylor, there is much that is beautiful but nothing that it prettified. It is serene one movement, raw and exposed the next.” – Rachel Howard, San Francisco Chronicle

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

Listen to Music Excerpt

LITTLE CIRCUS

Opus Number:  3
Music:  Igor Stravinsky
Set and Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  John Robertson
Date First Performed:  June 6, 1955

Photo: Turchi

Photo: Turchi

Photo: L. Stevenson Jr.

Photo: L. Stevenson Jr.

LOST, FOUND AND LOST

Opus Number:  75
Music:  Elevator music arranged by Donald York (commissioned score)
Costumes and stage design:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 14, 1982
Notes:  In 1957, Paul Taylor presented a single performance of 7 New Dances – a concert that caused most of the audience to leave soon after it began, and Louis Horst, one of his mentors, to publish a celebrated review consisting of nine square inches of blank space. Nevertheless, Taylor felt his collection of postural ABCs had spotlighted the close kinship of posture to gesture, and that the “found” materials from which the dances were made – natural postures, ordinary walking and running – would, when presented on stage, offer a glimpse into a dance-related area that had gone more or less unnoticed. Since 1957 Taylor has occasionally returned to these roots; for example, Esplanade in 1975. One of the 7 New Dances – Events I – became the springboard for Lost, Found and Lost. The dance also features natural postures – such as people waiting impatiently in line, as if at a bank – set to “elevator music.”

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

MARATHON CADENZAS

Opus Number:  140
Music:  Raymond Scott
Set and Costumes:  Santo Laquasto
Lighting:  James F. Ingalls
Date First Performed:  March 14, 2014

Marathon-Cadenzas_rep1

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Marathon-Cadenzas_rep2

Photo: Paul B. Goode

MAY APPLE

Opus Number:  17
Music:  Performed in silence
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Date First Performed:  March 18, 1958

MERCURIC TIDINGS

Opus Number:  76
Music:  Franz Schubert
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 20, 1982
Notes:  “Danced for the sheer joy of it, the controlled expenditure of animal energy, poetry expressed as a time and motion of study, young people cavorting with the kinetic propensities of young godlets.” – Clive Barnes, New York Post

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

MERIDIAN

Opus Number:  21
Music:  Pierre Boulez
Costumes:  Louise Thompson
Date First Performed:  February 13, 1960

Photo: A. Jeffry

Photo: A. Jeffry

Photo: A. Jeffry

Photo: A. Jeffry

MERIDIAN RE-CHOREGRAPHED

Opus Number:  23
Music:  Morton Feldman
Costumes:  Alex Katz
Date First Performed:  June 10, 1960
Notes:  Re-choreographed

MINIKIN FAIR

Opus Number:  92
Music:  David Koblitz, Douglas Wieselman and Thaddeus Spae
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 15, 1989

Photo: J. Mitchell

Photo: J. Mitchell

Photo: J. Elbers

Photo: J. Elbers

MOONBINE

Opus Number:  102
Music:  Claude Debussy
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 13, 1994

Photo: J. Elbers

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: J. Elbers

Photo: PTDC Archives

MUSETTE

Opus Number:  77
Music:  George Frideric Handel
Costumes:  Gene Moore
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 5, 1983

MUSICAL OFFERING

Opus Number:  85
Music:  Johann Sebastian Bach, orchestrated by Anton Webern and Frank Michael Beyer
Set and Costumes:  Gene Moore
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 8, 1986
Notes:  In 1747, Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, asked Johann Sebastian Bach to compose a fugue based on the king’s own music; Bach responded with A Musical Offering, built entirely on that “excellently beautiful” royal theme. Some 240 years later, unfazed by how revered Bach’s final chamber work had become, Paul Taylor used it as the score for one of his most profound dances: a requiem. A woman whose life is being celebrated introduces the work’s movement vocabulary, the primitive look of which was inspired by wood sculptures from New Guinea. The ensemble mourns her imminent passing by rocking, their arms crossed at times in the ancient burial pose. In the poignant climactic duet, the woman’s partner tries desperately to prevent her leave-taking. A final glorious lift propels her ascent to the afterlife.“One of the most extraordinarily reverberant dances of our time… Taylor’s choreography has never seemed more profoundly inspired by its music, never more confident in its subtle shifts of tome and never richer in its radiant humanity… The piece flows with uncommon ceremonial splendor.” – Allan Ulrich, San Francisco Examiner

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

NIGHTSHADE

Opus Number:  70
Music:  Alexander Scriabin
Costumes:  Gene Moore
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 19, 1979
Notes:  “Taylor’s deliciously Gothic romance is a work to take along when stranded on a desert island. A mock Victorian melodrama that makes for some uneasy laughter, it is about sexual repression and false innocence. Taylor is often at his funniest, when he is at his most serious.” – Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

NOAH'S MINSTRELS

Opus Number:  56
Music:  Louis Moreau Gottschalk
Set and Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  February 17, 1973
Notes:  Became part of the full-evening work, American Genesis

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

OBERTURA REPUBLICANA

Opus Number:  8
Music:  Carlos Chávez
Costumes:  James Waring
Date First Performed:  December 4, 1956

OF BRIGHT & BLUE BIRDS & THE GALA SUN

Opus Number:  94
Music:  Donald York
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 25, 1990

Photo: J. Vaqrtoogian

Photo: PTDC Archives

 

OFFENBACH OVERTURES

Opus Number:  103
Music:  Jacques Offenbach
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 12, 1995
Notes:  “Taylor-ed to keep you in stitches…Offenbach Overtures starts as a gentle spoof…but low comedy soon gets the upper hand, and you’re doubled over in laughing before you know it. A typical Taylor twist left the opening night crowd rolling in the aisles.” – Terry Teachout, Daily News

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

OH, YOU KID!

Opus Number:  109
Music:  Ragtime music (performed by the Paragon Ragtime Orchestra)
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  February 18, 1999
Notes:  “Oh, You Kid!,” a term of admiration used in the early 1900s, sets the tone for a Coney Island-style revue. Costumed in period beachwear, the dancers perform vaudeville numbers and a melodrama to Ragtime medleys of patriotic and operatic tunes as well as such Tin Pan Alley hits as “Meet Me Tonight in Dreamland” and “Knockout Drops.” There are references to such popular social dances of the era as the Bunny Hop, Turkey Trot, Camel Walk, Lame Duck and Grizzly Bear. The Ku Klux Klan, which was thriving despite a ban on female members, is parodied in a skit in which an eager young lady attempts to join. In a poignant solo, a not-so-young “eccentric dancer” performs a grotesque hootchy-kootch number for what must be the millionth time; she pulls a muscle, her undergarment creeps up and she loses her directional focus, but at the insistence of her manager – and despite the dearth of applause – she gamely goes back on stage to finish. The piece ends with young people filled with optimism performing a joyful, lyrical dance to “’Till the Clouds Roll By.”“An exuberant romp… Sheer and wonderful entertainment. But Taylor reminds us that the era of the Keystone Kops was also the heyday of the KKK…” – Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

 

OPTION

Opus Number:  22
Music:  Richard Max Field (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Louise Thompson
Date First Performed:  February, 13, 1960

Photo: J. Lougee

Photo: J. Lougee

ORBS

Opus Number:  42
Music:  Ludwig van Beethoven
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  July 4, 1966

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

OZ

Opus Number:  98
Music:  Wayne Horvitz and Robin Holcomb
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  First performed in 1991

PARTY MIX

Opus Number:  36
Music:  Alexei Haieff
Costumes:  Nancy Azara
Lighting:  Thomas Skelton
Date First Performed:  December 20, 1963

Photo: J. Mitchell

Photo: J. Mitchell

Photo: J. Mitchell

Photo: J. Mitchell

PERPETUAL DAWN

Opus Number:  138
Music:  Johann David Heinichen from the Dresden Concerti
Set and Costumes:  Santo Laquasto
Lighting:  James F. Ingalls
Date First Performed:  March 5, 2013
Notes: Set to sprightly baroque concertos, the dance depicts young people experiencing the awakening of love, perhaps for the very first time.

Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Perpetual-Dawn_rep2

Photo: Paul B. Goode

PHANTASMAGORIA

Opus Number:  132
Music:  Anonymous Renaissance Composers
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  July 15, 2010

Photo: Scott Suchman

Photo: Scott Suchman

Photo: Scott Suchman

Photo: Scott Suchman

Listen to Music Excerpt

PIAZZOLLA CALDERA

Opus Number:  106
Music:  Astor Piazzolla and Jerzy Peterburshsky
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  June 12, 1997
Notes:  Neruda wrote of poetry that mirrors “the flawed confusion of human beings,” poetry “worn away as if by acid by the labor of hands, impregnated with sweat and smoke, smelling of lilies and of urine, splashed by the variety of what we do, legally or illegally… as impure as old clothes, as a body, with its foodstains and its shame, with wrinkles, observations, dreams, wakefulness, prophecies, declarations of love and hate, stupidities, shocks, idylls….” He might have been describing the predatory dance that originated in the brothels of Buenos Aires at the turn of the 20th Century: tango. The music of tango – with Spanish, Italian, Indian, African and Jewish influences – was taken to new heights by Astor Piazzolla. Without a single authentic tango step, Paul Taylor captures the essence of tango culture. In a dimly lit dive, working class men and women confront each other in sizzling sexual duets and trios: men with women, men with men and women with women. Two men too drunk for conquests perform a loopy dance as lamplights sway dizzily overhead. A woman who has searched desperately for a partner but failed to find one, collapses – as if mortally wounded by a night without passion.“Stunning. Taylor looks at the attitudes implicit of the tango – as sexual game, as social identity – and reshapes them. Seethes and flares with sexuality and develops a huge erotic charge. One of Taylor’s most astonishing (even for him) creations.” – Clement Crisp, Financial Times of London

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

PIECE PERIOD

Opus Number:  31
Music:  Vivaldi, Telemann, Haydn, Scarlatti, Beethoven and Bonporti
Costumes:  John Rawlings
Date First Performed:  November 8, 1962
Notes:  “A barrel of laughs – a delicious lampoon of dance styles of various periods, climes and persuasions.  Entertains through superb craftsmanship and genuine wit.” – Walter Terry, New York Herald Tribune

Photo: Jack Mitchell

Photo: Jack Mitchell

POETRY IN MOTION

Opus Number:  35
Choreography:  Co-choreographed with Katherine Litz
Music:  Leopold Mozart
Costumes:  Katherine Litz and George Tacet
Lighting:  Thomas Skelton
Date First Performed:  August 26, 1963

POLARIS

Opus Number:  64
Music:  Donald York (commissioned score)
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  August 26, 1976
Notes:  Audience perception is explored in a two-part work in which the dancers move within and around a large metallic cube designed by Alex Katz, to music by Donald York. The choreography of the first section is repeated step for step in the second section but performed by different dancers to different music and lighting. As the score changes from pastoral to menacing and the lighting darkens, the second set of dancers perform the steps with different emphasis and attack than the first, and as a result the viewer’s perception of the exact same choreography is altered.“A barrel of laughs — a delicious lampoon of dance styles of various periods, climes and persuasions. Entertains through superb craftsmanship and genuine wit.” – Walter Terry, New York Herald Tribune

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

POST MERIDIAN

Opus Number:  41
Music:  Evelyn Lohoeffer de Boeck (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Thomas Skelton
Date First Performed:  March 31, 1965

PRIME NUMBERS

Opus Number:  104
Music:  David Israel
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  January 10, 1997

Photo: Howard Schatz

Photo: Howard Schatz

PRIVATE DOMAIN

Opus Number:  46
Music:  Iannis Xenakis
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  May 7, 1969

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

PROFILES

Opus Number:  71
Music:  Jan Radzynski (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Gene Moore
Lighting:  Mark Litvin
Date First Performed:  July 28, 1979
Notes:  “Mr. Taylor has created one of his most essential evocations of evil. The four dancers have come to seem bent on some dark private ritual, figures who have stepped off an archaic vase, loose in a world with which they are most terrifying at odds.” – Jennifer Dunning, New York Times

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

PROMETHEAN FIRE

Opus Number:  116
Music:  J.S. Bach, orchestrated by Leopold Stokowski
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  June 6, 2002
Notes:  Set to three keyboard works by Bach as richly orchestrated by Stokowski, Promethean Fire examines a kaleidoscope of emotional colors in the human condition. All 16 Taylor dancers, costumed in black, weave in and out of intricate patterns that mirror the way varied emotions weave themselves through life. A central duet depicts conflict and resolution following a cataclysmic event. But if destruction has been at the root of this dance, renewal of the spirit is its overriding message. A program note quotes Shakespeare, from Othello: Promethean fire “that can thy light relume.”“It has grandeur, majesty and a spiritual dimension. It is also quite simply one of the best dance works choreographed by Paul Taylor. …[The dancers] are building blocks in the human cathedral that Mr. Taylor constructs uncannily and perfectly with such powerful emotional resonance.” – Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

PUBLIC DOMAIN

Opus Number:  45
Music:  Music Collage by John Herbert McDowell (commissioned score)
Costumes:  John Rawlings
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 8, 1968

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

REBUS

Opus Number:  18
Music:  David Hollister (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Date First Performed:  March 18, 1958

Photo: Turchi

Photo: Turchi

Photo: Turchi

Photo: Turchi

ROSES

Opus Number:  82
Music:  Richard Wagner and Heinrich Baermann
Costumes:  William Ivey Long
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 10, 1985
Notes:  “Beautiful in its visual effects, poetic in its natural flow of movement. The piece is an ode to tenderness and blooms like a flower.” – Anna Kisselgoff, New York Times

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

RUNES

Opus Number:  62
Music:  Gerald Busby
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  August 13, 1975
Notes:  “A major creation… The enormous pathos that arises in the final moments of [this striking heroic poem], when all the elements of the piece are combined and restated and still the momentum leaps ahead – this pathos comes from the unstoppable energy of what Taylor has set in motion.” – Arlene Croce, The New Yorker

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

SCUDORAMA

Opus Number: 34
Music: Clarence Jackson
Set and Costumes: Alex Katz
Lighting: Thomas Skelton
Date First Performed: August 10, 1963
Notes: With its performances in 2008, Paul Taylor’s legendary Scudorama returned to the stage for the first time in 35 years. The title combined the type of clouds that race across the sky before a storm with a 1960s term for “bigger and better” that to Taylor connoted “tacky.” In his autobiography, the choreographer termed Scudorama a “dance of death leavened with light touches.” The dance dates from 1963, when Americans were still in the grip of nuclear fear following the Cuban missile crisis. Taylor was keenly attuned to the anxiety of the era and expressed these unresolved tensions in the dance, which carries a program note quoting Dante: “What souls are these who run through this Black haze… These are the nearly soulless whose lives concluded neither blame nor praise.” Clarence Jackson’s commissioned score and Alex Katz’s set and costumes contribute to the work’s unsettling aura. Scudorama touched a chord with audiences from its very first performance (given in silence due to the loss of the orchestral score) and remained among the Company’s most popular pieces for a decade. Its renaissance marks the return of a piece of American dance history.“It’s been in hibernation for 40 years! And what a work it is. Made immediately after Taylor’s first great hit, the buoyant and sunlit Aureole, Scudorama – dark and desolate – was a deliberate rebuke to Aureole’s joyous optimism. It’s a view not of hell, though, but of purgatory; hell was to follow… Almost no one in the audience had ever seen Scudorama, and it was a revelation – a blazing declaration of Taylor’s talent. You can see in it not only his future but aspects of his past.” – Robert Gottlieb, New York Observer

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

SEA LARK

Opus Number:  141
Music:  Francis Poulenc
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  James F. Ingalls
Date First Performed:  November 8, 2014

SEVEN NEW DANCES: DUET

Opus Number:  14
Music:  John Cage (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  Tharon Musser
Date First Performed:  October 20, 1957

SEVEN NEW DANCES: EPIC

Opus Number:  10
Music:  Telephone time signal
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  Tharon Musser
Date First Performed:  October 20, 1957

SEVEN NEW DANCES: EVENTS I

Opus Number:  11
Music:  Wind sounds
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  Tharon Musser
Date First Performed:  October 20, 1957

SEVEN NEW DANCES: EVENTS II

Opus Number:  15
Music:  Rain sounds
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  Tharon Musser
Date First Performed:  October 20, 1957

SEVEN NEW DANCES: OPPORTUNITY

Opus Number:  16
Music:  “Noise”
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  Tharon Musser
Date First Performed:  October 20, 1957

SEVEN NEW DANCES: PANORAMA

Opus Number:  13
Music:  Heartbeat sounds
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  Tharon Musser
Date First Performed:  October 20, 1957

SEVEN NEW DANCES: RESEMBLANCE

Opus Number:  12
Music:  John Cage (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Lighting:  Tharon Musser
Date First Performed:  October 20, 1957

SNOW WHITE

Opus Number:  79
Music:  Donald York (commissioned score)
Set:  David Gropman
Costumes:  Cynthia O’Neal
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 13, 1983
Notes:  “Clever fun. The simple, curvy outlines of all the movement are uncannily like to cartoon characters’ in the Disney film, but the sardonic twists to plot and character are Taylor’s own…” – Tobi Tobias, New York Magazine

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: J. Mitchell

Photo: J. Mitchell

SO LONG EDEN

Opus Number:  55
Music:  John Fahey
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  May 17, 1972
Notes:  Became part of the full-evening work, American Genesis

SPEAKING IN TONGUES

Opus Number:  91
Music:  Matthew Patton
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  November 10, 1988
Notes: A melodic and haunting score with fragments of an evangelical broadcast propels this impressionistic look at religious fanaticism and hypocrisy in a town led by a charismatic preacher who is both fearsome man of God and weak-willed sinner. During the opening barn dance the town’s underlying fervor is revealed by a participant who has a fit that suggests “speaking in tongues” – the unintelligible utterances of religious emotion by possessed communicants at a prayer service. A Man of the Cloth emerges from a doorway that’s been burnt as if by hellfire; his frantic solo of contrasting movements shows a conflicted nature. The Odd Man Out, a misfit and non-believer, suffers the wrath of the community and of A Mother who mistreats Her Unwanted Daughter for fancying him. Repentant, he is welcomed into the fold. A Party Girl, whose conquests have included the preacher, has her way with some pious young men, while The Daughter Grown Up is abused again, this time by her husband. All the while, His Better Half is a gentle and forgiving influence on the troubled preacher and the community. The drama ends with the townspeople lying onstage – chairs clutched above them like so many crosses at Calvary – as an evangelist is heard railing against the faithless, declaiming “Their blood will be required in Your hands.“Amazing… Illuminates the scary underside of America’s most cherished definition of itself: one nation, under God. It’s not love but violence and despair that make this pious little world go round. Only a great choreographer with the mind of a great novelist could have created a work of such imaginative breadth – a category in which Taylor has no peer.” – Laura Shapiro, Newsweek

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Listen to Music Excerpt

SPEAKING IN TONGUES FOR TELEVISION

Opus Number:  97
Date First Performed:  September 26, 1991
Notes:  Version for television first aired in 1991

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

SPINDRIFT

Opus Number:  99
Music:  Arnold Schoenberg
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  July 8, 1993
Notes:  “A quietly resounding success. Sensuously but deliberately understated… and suffused with the very lyricism (a gift Taylor enjoys with Balanchine and precious few others, of making dance music cleave together in a seamless arc of song) which had always marked him out like some special child of the gods.” – Clive Barnes, New York Post

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

SPORTS AND FOLLIES

Opus Number:  60
Music:  Erik Satie
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  August 7, 1974

Photo: J. Mitchell

Photo: J. Mitchell

Photo: Lois Greenfield

Photo: Lois Greenfield

SPRING ROUNDS

Opus Number:  122
Music:  Richard Strauss after François Couperin
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  July 5, 2005
Notes: “So Spring-like that it might as well have been designed to chase away stormy skies. The 14 dancers, moving in leaps and turns like birds and butterflies hypnotized by Strauss’s romantic music, capture the optimistic and seductive mood of sap rising.” – Alan Riding, New York Times

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Photo: © Lois Greenfield

Listen to Music Excerpt

SUNSET

Opus Number:  78
Music:  Edward Elgar (and recorded loon calls)
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 6, 1983
Notes:  A poignant look at camaraderie among soldiers and the sweethearts they leave behind — which, according to The New York Times, first marked Paul Taylor as “one of the great war poets.”“Mr. Taylor’s deeply moving meditation on war, on men with women, on men with men, on loss, on memory is one of the few great dance works of the past quarter-century…Delicately presented, achingly sad…I’m always startled to meet people who aren’t moved to tears by it.” – Robert Gottlieb, New York Observer

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

SYZYGY

Opus Number:  87
Music:  Donald York (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 21, 1987
Notes:  Dancers hurtle across the stage like so many celestial bodies orbiting and eclipsing each other.

“Full of utterly brilliant and seemingly disconnected shards of choreography. A full-throttle exercise in physicality, loose-limbed and speedy… It simply continues to increase its velocity, its sense of elfin delight, as the dance goes by. Leaves the audience gasping for more.” – Barry Johnson, The Oregonian

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

TABLET

Opus Number: 24
Music: David Hollister (commissioned score)
Set and Costumes: Ellsworth Kelly
Date First Performed: July 1, 1960

Photo: Helga Gilbert

Photo: Helga Gilbert

THE LEAST FLYCATCHER

Opus Number:  5
Music:  Robert Rauschenberg (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Date First Performed:  May 6, 1956

THE RED ROOM

Opus Number:  37
Music:  Gunther Schuller
Set and Costumes:  Alex Katz
Date First Performed:  June 20, 1964

Photo: C. Waldenfels

Photo: C. Waldenfels

Photo: C. Musnik

Photo: C. Musnik

THE SORCERER'S SOFA

Opus Number:  93
Music:  Paul Dukas
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  November 2, 1989

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

THE TOWER

Opus Number:  9
Music:  John Cooper (commissioned score)
Set:  Robert Rauschenberg
Costumes:  Jasper Johns
Date First Performed:  1957

Photo: L. Stevenson Jr.

Photo: L. Stevenson Jr.

THE UNCOMMITTED

Opus Number:  134
Music:  Arvo Pärt
Set and Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  July 21, 2011
Notes: In a comment on the impermanence of many relationships in the 21st Century, the dance looks at individuals who fail to make lasting connections.

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

THE WHITE SALAMANDER

Opus Number:  25
Music:  Joop Stokkermans (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Henk de Vries
Date First Performed:  October 11, 1960

THE WORD

Opus Number:  107
Music:  David Israel (commissioned score)
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  March 4, 1998
Notes:  The New Testament speaks of serving God with reverence and godly fear, “For our God is a consuming fire.” The students at a religious prep school have taken these words to heart. Dressed in identical uniforms that stress their lack of individuality, they conform blindly to a rigid system of beliefs. Their regimented devotion is challenged by an enigmatic, irreverent figure – a succubus – intent on wreaking havoc. The supplicants are haunted by her presence. Following a frenzy of fervor, the work ends with the pious youths marching in lockstep, trailed as ever by the demon.“The message was powerful, the performance so intense and involving that the mesmerized audience let out a sigh of exhaustion when it was over.” – Wilma Salisbury, Cleveland Plain Dealer

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

 

THREE DUBIOUS MEMORIES

Opus Number:  133
Music:  Peter Elyakim Taussig
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 30, 2010
Notes:  With this dance, Mr. Taylor explores the subjective nature of memory. He dramatically illustrates that events may be recalled differently by various participants, each of whom believes in the accuracy of their own version. “The mind remembers facts the way it wants them to be,” according to the dance maker.

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

TO MAKE CROPS GROW

Opus Number:  137
Music:  Ferde Grofe
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  James Ingalls
Date First Performed:  November 3, 2012
Notes: Villagers perform holdovers of an ancient ritual.

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Listen to Music Excerpt

TRACER

Opus Number:  29
Music:  James Tenny (commissioned score)
Set and Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Date First Performed:  April 11, 1962

Photo: M. Swope

Photo: M. Swope

Photo: PTDC Archives

Photo: PTDC Archives

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA (REDUCED)

Opus Number:  124
Music:  Amilcare Ponchielli
Costumes:  Santo Loquasto
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  April 15, 2006
Notes:  Although based on one of Shakespeare’s bitterest plays, Troilus and Cressida (reduced) is a wickedly funny romance. Three Cupids awaken romantic notions in the two protagonists. Their bumbling courtship is interrupted when three Greek soldiers carry Cressida off while Troilus snoozes. His rescue attempt fails, but the soldiers lose interest in Cressida when they and the Cupids — now tipsy — become infatuated with each other. The dance ends with all happy ever after.“Taylor’s funniest work to date dazzles with bright-spirited, belly-laugh humor [turning] Shakespeare’s bitter play of love and betrayal into a hoot. At the root of his humor lies his astute observation of human nature involving romantic matters in which mere humans appear as stumbling, clueless oafs.” – Susan Broili, Durham Herald-Sun

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Paul B. Goode

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

Photo: Tom Caravaglia

Listen to Music Excerpt

TROPES

Opus Number:  7
Music:  Folk music
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Date First Performed:  December 4, 1956

UNTITLED DUET

Opus Number:  6
Music:  Done in silence
Costumes:  Robert Rauschenberg
Date First Performed:  May 6, 1956

Photo: L. Stevenson Jr.

Photo: L. Stevenson Jr.

UNTITLED QUARTET

Opus Number:  59
Music:  Igor Stravinsky
Costumes:  Rouben Ter-Arutunian
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  February 16, 1974
Notes:  Re-working of Fibers

WEST OF EDEN

Opus Number:  57
Music:  Bohuslav Martinů
Costumes:  George Tacet
Lighting:  Jennifer Tipton
Date First Performed:  October 13, 1973
Notes:  Originally part of the full-evening work, American Genesis